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Boyan Manchev: Pandora's Toy, or zoon technicon and the Technical Ghosts of the Future
Pandora's Toy, or zoon technicon and the Technical Ghosts of the Future
(p. 67 – 79)

Boyan Manchev

Pandora's Toy, or zoon technicon and the Technical Ghosts of the Future

PDF, 13 pages

  • affects
  • the girl
  • psychoanalysis
  • history of philosophy
  • gender
  • cultural studies
  • subjectivity

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Boyan Manchev

Boyan Manchev is a philosopher, Professor at the New Bulgarian University (Sofia), former Director of Program and Vice-President of the International College of Philosophy in Paris and Professor at the Berlin University of the Arts. He is the author of fifteen books, among which are Freedom in Spite of Everything. Surcritique and Modal Ontology (2020), The New Athanor. Prolegomena to Philosophical Fantastic (vol. 1, 2020), Clouds. Philosophy of the Free Body (2019), Logic of the Political (2012), Miracolo (Lanfranchi, 2011), L’altération du monde: Pour une esthétique radicale (Lignes, 2009), La Métamorphose et l’instant – Désorganisation de la vie (La Phocide, 2009), The Body-Metamorphosis (2007), The Unimaginable (2003). https://boyanmanchev.net/
Other texts by Boyan Manchev for DIAPHANES
Elisabeth von Samsonow (ed.): Epidemic Subjects—Radical Ontology

Modern philosophy continues to grapple with the idea of subjectivity—and, as the concept of subjectivity has been refined and redefined, the struggle has spread to the ways we conceive of sovereignty, collectivity, nationality, and identity. Yet, in the absence of an authoritative account of these concepts, new ways of thinking have emerged which continue to evolve.
Epidemic Subjects—Radical Ontology brings together a team of contributors who forge a radically inclusive definition of subjectivity. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of the “girl” as a heuristic device for examining modern society, they tie together recent trends in philosophy and offer a concrete way forward from the conception of the “thing” or “object” privileged by new materialism, speculative realism, and other theories of subjectivity.